Coal Miner’s Cemetery — Part 2

July 2, 2015

Last month, I introduced the miner’s cemetery on 129th Avenue Southeast with a promise to remember some of those interred there.

John McKnight is a well-known name in the area, and the Renton School District even named a middle school after him. His father, also John McKnight, was an important man in the Newcastle coal mining era and is buried in our cemetery.

BackTrackingJohn McKnight, the father, had served in the Civil War and came west after the conflict looking for opportunity. He was very interested in the birth of our nation and wrote and delivered a speech commemorating Independence Day in 1875.

Read more

‘Little giant’ makes Newcastle’s history come to life

January 7, 2015

NEW — 6 a.m. Jan. 7, 2015

Time is running out for residents to experience Newcastle’s history up close and personal at the Renton History Museum.

The “Newcastle: Little Giant of the Eastside” exhibit debuted Sept. 9 and is set to run until Feb. 7 at the Renton History Museum. It features pictures, maps and objects, most on loan courtesy of the Newcastle Historical Society, from Newcastle’s coal-mining past.

There are features about the still-standing Baima House and the Newcastle Cemetery, as well as a wall-sized present-day map pinpointing several historical locations.

The artifacts range from mining tools to wine-making devices, because, as collections manager Sarah Samson noted, “there were a lot of Italians” in Newcastle.

Learn more at www.rentonwa.gov/rentonhistorymuseum.

2014 was a year of change for Newcastle

January 2, 2015

In 2014, the city of Newcastle celebrated a birthday, lost an icon and set the stage for the future. Here are some of the top stories of the year, in no particular order:

Newcastle pioneer Milt Swanson passes away

Family, neighbors and community leaders gathered Jan. 25 to honor the life of Milt Swanson, a titan of Newcastle history and a man with an unceasing, warming smile.

The Newcastle pioneer, born and raised in this community, spent all of his 95 years in the same area, 90 of which were in the same company house that still stands at the edge of town near the Cougar Mountain trailhead. Read more

‘Little giant’ makes history come to life

October 3, 2014

By Greg Farrar Rich Crispo, Newcastle councilman, stands next to a display case with Milt Swanson's coal miner helmet and an information poster honoring the late 95-year-old Newcastle native's contributions to preserving the city's history. The Renton History Museum's Newcastle retrospective exhibit is on display until Feb. 7.

By Greg Farrar
Rich Crispo, Newcastle councilman, stands next to a display case with Milt Swanson’s coal miner helmet and an information poster honoring the late 95-year-old Newcastle native’s contributions to preserving the city’s history. The Renton History Museum’s Newcastle retrospective exhibit is on display until Feb. 7.

The first thing visitors see upon walking into the Renton History Museum’s Newcastle exhibit is, appropriately, a tribute to a man that means so much to the city’s history. Read more

Get to know your city

October 3, 2014

The city celebrated its 20th year of incorporation in September, but locals know, at least they should, that Newcastle’s story goes back much farther than that.

Newcastle’s coal-mining history dates back to the mid 1800s, when the city was second only to Seattle in population.

The Newcastle mining site operated for about 100 years, until the mid-1900s. Workers extracted nearly 11 million tons of coal during that period.

Vestiges of that history remain scattered across the city in the form of landmarks such as the Baima House, a century-old company house that used to house miners and their families, and the Newcastle Cemetery, the final resting place for a number of Newcastle pioneers. Read more

Notes from Newcastle: Newcastle Trails at 15

October 3, 2014

G

Garry Kampen

This year is the 20th anniversary of Newcastle, a small city that ranks high in livability, and the 15th anniversary of Newcastle Trails, a nonprofit citizens group that has worked for parks, trails and open space, in close cooperation with the city, since 1999.

I’m writing to celebrate Newcastle’s amazing and still-growing trail system, and to encourage you to explore it and enjoy it. Check NT’s website, www.newcastletrails.org; download our latest map and trail guide; join NT by emailing info@newcastletrails.org (for trail news, no dues); attend our Oct. 6 board meeting (7 p.m. at Regency Newcastle); and consider volunteering for the board, or lending a hand with trail work, computer work (GIS, web, writing), lobbying, fundraising — whatever you’d like to do. Read more

Historical Society preps for busy September

August 29, 2014

Historical Society 2014

The Newcastle Historical Society is in for a busy September with programming at Newcastle Days, the Newcastle Library and the Renton History Museum. Read more

Weekend roundup: Read poetry, clean the cemetery and get healthy with the YMCA

April 25, 2014

NEW — 11:20 a.m. April 25, 2014

File The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up April 26.

File
The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up April 26.

There are always a multitude of things to do in Newcastle, but here is a quick roundup of some notable weekend happenings. Read more

Historical Society hosts April 26 cemetery cleanup

April 16, 2014

NEW — 6 a.m. April 16, 2014

File The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up April 26.

File
The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up April 26.

The Newcastle Historical Society will host an April 26 work party to clean and spruce up the city’s iconic cemetery. Read more

Historical Society hosts March 22 cemetery cleanup

March 20, 2014

NEW — 9 a.m. March 20, 2014

File The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up March 22.

File
The Newcastle Historical Society will host a cemetery clean up March 22.

The Newcastle Historical Society will host a March 22 work party to clean and spruce up the city’s iconic cemetery. Read more

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