Editorial — Linda Newing for Newcastle City Council

September 30, 2015

NEW — 3:37 p.m. Sept. 30, 2015

It takes courage and stamina for someone to throw his or her hat in the ring and run for public office. You have to be prepared for any question, any issue. You also have to become an expert on many topics.

That’s why we commend Linda Newing and Victoria Sandoval for coming forward to run for Newcastle City Council Position 1 in the Nov. 3 election.

Both women came to our offices for an interview last week so we could ask them questions about various issues, including the possible Energize Eastside route coming through Newcastle, how to involve residents in the city’s growth and what they would do to raise revenue for the city.

Both gave great answers, but we have to choose Newing as our preferred candidate for the position. Read more

Two candidates vie for council Position No. 1

August 10, 2015

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 10, 2015

The city’s election lineup is set, and while there are four Newcastle City Council seats with expiring terms, only one race includes more than a single candidate.

Community Activities commissioners Linda Newing and Victoria Sandoval will compete to fill the seat being vacated by City Councilwoman Lisa Jensen.

Linda Newing

Linda Newing

Victoria Sandoval

Victoria Sandoval

Incumbents Gordon Bisset and Carol Simpson will each run unopposed to retain their seats. Planning Commissioner Allen Dauterman initially drew a challenger for Position No. 3, but Rob Lemmon withdrew. Read more

Newcastle’s history shaped King County as we know it

January 2, 2015

In 1853, the area around current-day Newcastle was heavily forested with 10-foot diameter trees, a multitude of streams, and many gorges and valleys. It was also home to wildlife including cougars, bears, raccoons, bobcats and deer.

In that year, a couple of explorers found something that would change that landscape forever — chunks of coal along a creek (later to be named Coal Creek).

The first coal wasn’t mined until 10 years later, but when it began, it was in earnest. In the 100 years between 1863 and 1963, the Newcastle coal mines produced 10.5 million tons of coal.

The coal was of good quality, and the proximity to Seattle made it an important commodity. In 1870, Seattle had only 1,107 residents, but because coal was being shipped to San Francisco and the growth of the port, that number grew to 42,837 by 1890, only 20 years later. Read more