Allen Dauterman is lone candidate for City Council Position No. 3

September 30, 2015

NEW — 3:21 p.m. Sept. 30, 2015

Newcastle City Council candidate Allen Dauterman takes his unique situation in stride.

Dauterman, chairman of the city’s Planning Commission, is running unopposed for council Position No. 3. Yet, the general election ballot will tell a different story.

Allen Dauterman

Allen Dauterman

Rob Lemmon’s name will appear alongside Dauterman’s, but Lemmon, a former planning commissioner himself, has made it clear that he is not a candidate. Read more

Candidates talk about the issues, vie for newspaper endorsement

September 30, 2015

NEW — 3:16 p.m. Sept. 30, 2015

Candidates for the only contested Newcastle City Council race separately convened in Issaquah Sept. 25, where they met with The Issaquah Press newspaper group General Manager Charles Horton and Managing Editor Kathleen R. Merrill.

Newcastle News is one of four newspapers in that group.

Victoria Sandoval

Victoria Sandoval

Linda Newing

Linda Newing

Horton and Merrill quizzed Victoria Sandoval and Linda Newing on everything from traffic to city finances, as the two made their cases for a Newcastle News endorsement. Newcastle News previously asked the candidates a series of questions here and profiled them here in the lead-up to the election. Read more

To the Editor — September 2015

September 2, 2015

NEW — 4:48 p.m. Sept. 2, 2015

Reject the proposed School Woods plan

I am writing this to express my opposition to the proposed plan for the School Woods.  Beyond the loss of trails, the increased residential and “cut-through” traffic through two established neighborhoods, and the violation of existing wetlands, it is a shame to have lost a potential open space and park area.

This is especially true in a city having the least park land of any in the area  (4.7 acres of park acreage per 1,000 residents in Newcastle, compared to Renton’s 12.7 acres and Bellevue’s 21.2).

Further, the proposed development shows a complete lack of imagination and respect for the land. The site plan as it stands is in the perfect image of California practice:  Flatten for building pad, drop, flatten for building pad, drop again, flatten for building pad, drop again, etc., extending over the entire site. This is a forced, high-density housing development that shows little or no sympathy and respect for existing neighborhood ambiance. Read more

Two candidates vie for council Position No. 1

August 10, 2015

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 10, 2015

The city’s election lineup is set, and while there are four Newcastle City Council seats with expiring terms, only one race includes more than a single candidate.

Community Activities commissioners Linda Newing and Victoria Sandoval will compete to fill the seat being vacated by City Councilwoman Lisa Jensen.

Linda Newing

Linda Newing

Victoria Sandoval

Victoria Sandoval

Incumbents Gordon Bisset and Carol Simpson will each run unopposed to retain their seats. Planning Commissioner Allen Dauterman initially drew a challenger for Position No. 3, but Rob Lemmon withdrew. Read more

Groundbreaking times two

August 7, 2015

NEW — 6 a.m. Aug. 7, 2015

Aegis Gardens, Atlas bring one-of-a-kind communities

History is one of Newcastle’s greatest assets.

The Eastside suburb’s story dates back more than 150 years, when it was the second largest town in King County. During that time, coal was king, and Newcastle had plenty of it.

By Greg Farrar Breaking ground on Aegis Gardens July 30 are (from left) Newcastle Mayor Steve Buri; Aegis Living founder and CEO Dwayne Clark; former U.S. ambassador to China, Washington state governor and King County Executive Gary Locke; and current King County Executive Dow Constantine.

By Greg Farrar
Breaking ground on Aegis Gardens July 30 are (from left) Newcastle Mayor Steve Buri; Aegis Living founder and CEO Dwayne Clark; former U.S. ambassador to China, Washington state governor and King County Executive Gary Locke; and current King County Executive Dow Constantine.

That history was at the forefront of attendees’ minds July 30, when nearly 300 people gathered in Newcastle to celebrate the groundbreaking of a unique Aegis Living retirement community. Read more

SolTerra breaks ground on Newcastle apartment building

July 29, 2015

NEW — 5:45 p.m. July 29, 2015

Developers moved the first pieces of dirt today at a site that will soon house a 98-unit, six-story apartment building in Newcastle.

SolTerra, a fast-growing design, build and services firm with the mission of creating sustainable, livable and innovative buildings, broke ground on Atlas, its first apartment project in the state.

By Christina Corrales-Toy Members of the SolTerra team break ground on Atlas, a new LEED Platinum-designed mixed-use apartment building in Newcastle.

By Christina Corrales-Toy
Members of the SolTerra team break ground on Atlas, a new LEED Platinum-designed mixed-use apartment building in Newcastle.

Read more

Orville McDonald fills Planning Commission vacancy

March 5, 2014

The Newcastle City Council has appointed resident Orville McDonald to fill the Planning Commission vacancy left by Deputy Mayor John Drescher.

McDonald is a senior product manager at Microsoft, and has background in acquiring and managing rental properties, as well as land development.

Orville McDonald 2013

Orville McDonald

“Having lived in a variety of places, what drew my young family and I to Newcastle is the sense of community and how well it has been laid out,” he wrote in his application.

Read more

City Council passes developer stimulus ordinance

January 7, 2011

The City Council unanimously passed an extension to a developer stimulus ordinance at its Dec. 7 meeting that will continue helping certain development projects in the city withstand the economic recession.

The ordinance — originally adopted in February — defers fee collection and allows more time for developers to obtain permits and city approvals.

With the extension, preliminary plat approvals granted between Jan. 1, 2006, and Dec. 31, 2014, may be valid for two additional years; engineering review permits set to expire in 2011 may be valid for one additional year; and traffic as well as parks and open space impact fees — paid to the city — may be deferred for all developments for four to six months.

Through preliminary plat approval, the city approves the design and layout of a given development, and the approval is typically valid for five years. Nine developments are eligible for the extension.

Engineering review permits give developers clearance to begin constructing utilities, typically the first step in construction, City Manager Rob Wyman said. The permits are typically valid for two years, and several developments are eligible for this extension as well.

Impact fees are required to offset a development’s impact on public infrastructure and adjust for the provision of public services. The city typically collects these fees when it issues building permits and/or gives final approval to a development.

Redmond, Sammamish, Kenmore, Kirkland, Federal Way and King County have taken similar actions in the past two years.