Three candidates vie for council seat 5

July 3, 2009

By Jim Feehan

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By Jim Feehan
The city’s election lineup is set and includes a primary election next month for one City Council position.
In addition, after announcing his intent to run for council, veteran sportscaster Tony Ventrella decided not to file for office.
Three people — Larry Betsch, Karin Blakley and Rich Crispo — will run in the Aug. 8 primary for position 5 on the council. The top two candidates advance to the Nov. 3 general election.
Larry Betsch
Larry Betsch retired after a career with the Boeing Co. and IBM, where he worked in a diverse number of management disciplines, including financial control, proposal development and project management. Betsch is a member of the Newcastle Planning Commission, a mentor in the Renton schools at Highlands Elementary School, and a member of the Newcastle Chamber of Commerce.
He lives with his wife and son in the China Creek neighborhood, where he enjoys hiking, biking and golf opportunities in the community.
“The people who lead us in the future will make crucial decisions, which will impact us all,” Betsch said. “I believe good government should listen and respond to the needs of our families, neighborhoods, and our current and future business partners, with effective communication and strong leadership.
“This will ensure the foundation this city was built on will remain vital and strong,” he said. “We need to work together to improve our neighborhoods by communicating with our residents and dealing with their issues.”
Karin Blakley
Karin Blakley is a district manager for the Bellevue office of Waddell & Reed, an investment management and financial planning company. Prior to that, Blakley worked in advertising, sales and management positions. In 1999, she ran for City Council and lost to incumbent Pam Lee by 57 votes.
Blakley said her experience and background could help the city in addressing its budget woes.
“Our key revenue sources are down significantly,” she said. “This situation creates a sizable hole in our current budget, which means thoughtful analysis and cost trimming needs to occur. For 25 years, I’ve dealt with the budgets and revenue challenges of various organizations and businesses. This is a skill set that will be useful in working through the situation we presently face.”
Blakley said she would start a “Buy Newcastle” initiative to support businesses and encourage residents to buy local. Obtaining a unique ZIP code for Newcastle will also be a focus to ensure that sales tax revenues are properly calculated, she said.
Rich Crispo
Rich Crispo spent 35 years working in the aerospace industry with four different companies. He retired from the Boeing Co. in 2006 after 28 years as chief information officer for its largest single contract, future combat systems for the Army. He was responsible for a $100 million annual budget.
Crispo said he decided to run mainly because he disagrees with decisions made by the council majority of Ben Varon, Dan Hubbell, Sonny Putter and Jean Garber.
“On significant issues, the council is split 4-3 in favor of an expanded, dense downtown,” he said. “There would be five-story, multiuse buildings lining our one intersection. There is little, or no, attention to our bedroom characteristics — open space, trails or services that treat everyday needs — that make Newcastle a great place to live.”
He said the environment at council meetings is hostile to interested residents and somewhat abusive to councilors in the minority.
“Let’s change the city vision to one that resembles why we choose to live here, and help create an environment that will entice more residents to become involved,” he said.
Hubbell, current position 5 councilman and deputy mayor, isn’t running again. He was elected to the council in 2005, defeating Steve Buri.
“After eight years of service, it’s time for me to move on,” Hubbell said of his four years on the council and four prior years on the city’s Planning Commission.
All of the city’s council seats are at-large positions, meaning none of the people on the council represent a specific neighborhood.

The city’s election lineup is set and includes a primary election next month for one City Council position.

In addition, after announcing his intent to run for council, veteran sportscaster Tony Ventrella decided not to file for office.Three people — Larry Betsch, Karin Blakley and Rich Crispo — will run in the Aug. 8 primary for position 5 on the council. The top two candidates advance to the Nov. 3 general election.

Larry Betsch

Betsch

Betsch

Larry Betsch retired after a career with the Boeing Co. and IBM, where he worked in a diverse number of management disciplines, including financial control, proposal development and project management. Betsch is a member of the Newcastle Planning Commission, a mentor in the Renton schools at Highlands Elementary School, and a member of the Newcastle Chamber of Commerce.

He lives with his wife and son in the China Creek neighborhood, where he enjoys hiking, biking and golf opportunities in the community.

“The people who lead us in the future will make crucial decisions, which will impact us all,” Betsch said. “I believe good government should listen and respond to the needs of our families, neighborhoods, and our current and future business partners, with effective communication and strong leadership.

“This will ensure the foundation this city was built on will remain vital and strong,” he said. “We need to work together to improve our neighborhoods by communicating with our residents and dealing with their issues.”

Karin Blakley

Blakley

Blakley

Karin Blakley is a district manager for the Bellevue office of Waddell & Reed, an investment management and financial planning company. Prior to that, Blakley worked in advertising, sales and management positions. In 1999, she ran for City Council and lost to incumbent Pam Lee by 57 votes.

Blakley said her experience and background could help the city in addressing its budget woes.

“Our key revenue sources are down significantly,” she said. “This situation creates a sizable hole in our current budget, which means thoughtful analysis and cost trimming needs to occur. For 25 years, I’ve dealt with the budgets and revenue challenges of various organizations and businesses. This is a skill set that will be useful in working through the situation we presently face.”

Blakley said she would start a “Buy Newcastle” initiative to support businesses and encourage residents to buy local. Obtaining a unique ZIP code for Newcastle will also be a focus to ensure that sales tax revenues are properly calculated, she said.

Rich Crispo

Crispo

Crispo

Rich Crispo spent 35 years working in the aerospace industry with four different companies. He retired from the Boeing Co. in 2006 after 28 years as chief information officer for its largest single contract, future combat systems for the Army. He was responsible for a $100 million annual budget.

Crispo said he decided to run mainly because he disagrees with decisions made by the council majority of Ben Varon, Dan Hubbell, Sonny Putter and Jean Garber.

“On significant issues, the council is split 4-3 in favor of an expanded, dense downtown,” he said. “There would be five-story, multiuse buildings lining our one intersection. There is little, or no, attention to our bedroom characteristics — open space, trails or services that treat everyday needs — that make Newcastle a great place to live.”

He said the environment at council meetings is hostile to interested residents and somewhat abusive to councilors in the minority.

“Let’s change the city vision to one that resembles why we choose to live here, and help create an environment that will entice more residents to become involved,” he said.

Hubbell, current position 5 councilman and deputy mayor, isn’t running again. He was elected to the council in 2005, defeating Steve Buri.

“After eight years of service, it’s time for me to move on,” Hubbell said of his four years on the council and four prior years on the city’s Planning Commission.

All of the city’s council seats are at-large positions, meaning none of the people on the council represent a specific neighborhood.

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  • If you miss the 30-day deadline and are not currently registered in the state, you must register in person at the King County Elections Office no later than 15 days before the election.
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Source: King County Elections Office

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