Editorial: Completed parkway is source of pride

July 3, 2009

By Contributor

best online viagra forum viagra

Riddle: When is a bridge and a road more than just a bridge and a road?
Answer: When the bridge and road is a piece of art, a source of community pride, a grand entrance to a small city — when it is part of the Coal Creek Parkway in Newcastle.
The parkway has been a source of grumbling for years. There was the $40 million cost, the extravagance to make it a showpiece and, of course, the traffic slow downs during construction. But baby, take a look at it now!
The cost to the city was less than expected with the late arrival of a $3 million grant, thanks to careful city oversight and financial support from other government funds and grants. The construction is over and traffic will move through the corridor without the diversion of traffic cones, flaggers and equipment.
And it is beautiful. The brick-red arches and railings of the bridge over May Creek, the careful attention to the design of the retaining walls, the wide sidewalks from city center to Lake Boren, and the graceful landscaping are already being talked about — with pride by Newcastle residents and with awe by visitors passing through.
But the Coal Creek Parkway is something more. It is a vision of what the city can become. The parkway has set a design standard that leaves us eager to see more. Architects who are designing Newcastle’s future commercial and residential core need only look to the parkway for inspiration and an understanding of what the new Newcastle can and should be.
The city staff, City Council members and planning commissioners should take a bow. Amid controversy during the project, they held tight to a vision they shared — and do share. The conversations to get us to this point have not always been amiable, but they have all been passionate about Newcastle and its future.
Hats off to the contractors and their crews who brought the project in under budget, to the citizens and drivers who put up with construction for seven long years, to the King County Council and 41st District state legislators who helped secure funding.

Riddle: When is a bridge and a road more than just a bridge and a road?

Answer: When the bridge and road is a piece of art, a source of community pride, a grand entrance to a small city — when it is part of the Coal Creek Parkway in Newcastle.The parkway has been a source of grumbling for years. There was the $40 million cost, the extravagance to make it a showpiece and, of course, the traffic slow downs during construction. But baby, take a look at it now!

The cost to the city was less than expected with the late arrival of a $3 million grant, thanks to careful city oversight and financial support from other government funds and grants. The construction is over and traffic will move through the corridor without the diversion of traffic cones, flaggers and equipment.

And it is beautiful. The brick-red arches and railings of the bridge over May Creek, the careful attention to the design of the retaining walls, the wide sidewalks from city center to Lake Boren, and the graceful landscaping are already being talked about — with pride by Newcastle residents and with awe by visitors passing through.

But the Coal Creek Parkway is something more. It is a vision of what the city can become. The parkway has set a design standard that leaves us eager to see more. Architects who are designing Newcastle’s future commercial and residential core need only look to the parkway for inspiration and an understanding of what the new Newcastle can and should be.

The city staff, City Council members and planning commissioners should take a bow. Amid controversy during the project, they held tight to a vision they shared — and do share. The conversations to get us to this point have not always been amiable, but they have all been passionate about Newcastle and its future.

Hats off to the contractors and their crews who brought the project in under budget, to the citizens and drivers who put up with construction for seven long years, to the King County Council and 41st District state legislators who helped secure funding.

Bookmark and Share

Comments

Got something to say?

Before you comment, please note:

  • These comments are moderated.
  • Comments should be relevant to the topic at hand and contribute to its discussion.
  • Personal attacks and/or excessive profanity will not be tolerated and such comments will not be approved.
  • This is not your personal chat room or forum, so please stay on topic.