Officer honored with award

November 4, 2008

By Jim Feehan

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Jerry Gilley intervened in domestic violence incident 

Jerry ‘Jay’ Gilley (right), Newcastle police officer, looks at his Norm Maleng Outstanding Law Enforcement Award with Newcastle police chief Melinda Irvine (middle) and police chaplain Pat Tosch Oct. 3 after the Seattle City Hall Plaza ceremony. Photo by Greg Farrar.

Jerry ‘Jay’ Gilley (right), Newcastle police officer, looks at his Norm Maleng Outstanding Law Enforcement Award with Newcastle police chief Melinda Irvine (middle) and police chaplain Pat Tosch Oct. 3 after the Seattle City Hall Plaza ceremony. Photo by Greg Farrar.

A simple clerical error, a misspelled name, caused a Newcastle woman to endure months of relentless threats by an abusive ex-husband. He was stalking her and threatened to kill her. 

When she filed for a protection order, it mistakenly was filed under the wrong name. Last Thanksgiving, Newcastle Police Officer Jay Gilley responded to a call from the woman and corrected the mistake. 

His perseverance and attention to detail was instrumental in the arrest of the ex-husband, Michael Draman, during a SWAT team callout. Draman was sentenced to 38 months in prison for felony stalking and multiple protection order violations. 

Gilley was among three recipients of the 12th annual Norm Maleng Outstanding Law Enforcement Award Oct. 3 at the Seattle City Hall Plaza. The award honors those who work to end domestic violence. It was presented in conjunction with domestic violence awareness month.

Pam Hall, a Federal Way police administrative assistant, and Scott Dungan, a King County community services officer, were also honored.

Gilley said the man made 30 to 40 threats and showed up at his ex-wife’s work and house. He also had a prior conviction of manslaughter in California.

“The protection order was misfiled because of a truncated last name,” said Gilley, a Newcastle officer since 2000. “With the corrected information, we were able to charge the ex-husband. 

“It’s great to be recognized for this award by the county.”

Maleng called domestic violence a crime against the human spirit, King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg said of his predecessor.

“A relationship that begins with faith, hope and love turns violent with domestic violence families living in fear, abuse, violence and, sadly, even death,” Satterberg said. 

King County Sheriff Sue Rahr said Gilley exemplifies a new generation of officers who take domestic violence complaints seriously. Rahr said that wasn’t the case when she joined the sheriff’s office in 1979.

“Jay is among the best and brightest of my deputies,” she said. “He’s an excellent example of how one officer can change a life.”

Newcastle Police Chief Melinda Irvine said Gilley is a wonderful person and police officer.

“So many people in Newcastle have come to find Jay is caring and compassionate,” Irvine said.

Pat Tosch, of Newcastle, a police chaplain with the sheriff’s office, has known Gilley since he arrived at the department after a five-year stint with Honolulu police. Six years ago, Tosch took Gilley aside following the fatal shooting of his partner, Officer Rich Herzog.

“I think it’s incredibly wonderful that Jay is being honored,” Tosch said. “I don’t think it could happen to a nicer guy.”

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